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Here Are The DEA’s Newest Slang Terms for Marijuana

If you’re a marijuana connoisseur—or even remotely aware of how normal people talk about pot—then this should be fun, because the Drug Enforcement Administration added over 50 new terms since last year. And some of them are just plain weird.

“My Brother,” “Pink Panther” and “Plant” made the list for the first time this year.

That said, it seems that the federal agency is beginning to understand the concept of strains, as several common strain names are included in the updated list, released this month: blue dream, green crack and train wreck, for example.

But then there are a few that might throw you for a loop. “Terpenes”—oils secreted by plants like cannabis that give them their distinct smell and taste—is apparently a slang word for weed itself now. So is “MMJ” (typically short for “medical marijuana”) as well as the old school term “devil’s lettuce,” according to the DEA.

“Prop 215,” the California ballot measure that first made medical cannabis legal in 1996, is new to the list as well.

Also new: “a-bomb,” marijuana laced with heroin, and “bazooka,” marijuana “mixed with cocaine paste.” The DEA also lists three terms for cannabis laced with PCP (“bionic,” “wet” and “zoom”).

And then there’s…”shoes.” Oh, OK…

Here’s a full list of the DEA’s new cannabis slang terms.

  • A-Bomb
  • Alfalfa
  • Almohada
  • AZ
  • Bazooka
  • Bionic
  • Blue Dream
  • Branches
  • Café
  • Cajita
  • Camara
  • Diosa Verde
  • Elefante Pata
  • Escoba
  • Fattie
  • Gallina
  • Garifa
  • Green Crack
  • Greenhouse
  • Hoja
  • Leña
  • Llesca
  • Loud
  • Lucas
  • Manteca
  • Mersh
  • Mexicali Haze
  • MMJ
  • My Brother
  • Nug
  • Palomita
  • Pasto
  • Pasture
  • Peliroja
  • Pink Panther
  • Pintura
  • Plant
  • Porro
  • Prop 215
  • Purple OG
  • Red Hair
  • Shoes
  • Sour OG
  • Sticky
  • Tangy OG
  • Terp
  • Terpenes
  • Tigitty
  • Top Shelf
  • Train Wreck
  • Trinity OG
  • Valle
  • Zip

For the record, the DEA itself doesn’t come up with these terms off the top of its head. It compiles updated terms on all drugs based on “a variety of law enforcement and open sources,” according to the new report.

“It is designed as a ready reference for law enforcement personnel who are confronted with hundreds of slang terms and code words used to identify a wide variety of controlled substances, designer drugs, synthetic compounds, measurements, locations, weapons, and other miscellaneous terms relevant to the drug trade.”

The DEA acknowledges that, “due to the dynamics of the ever-changing drug scene, subsequent additions, deletions, and corrections are inevitable.”

Another new thing this year is the report’s length: It’s 125 pages, compared to 2017’s seven pages. The added length is due to a robust new “slang-to-drug” lookup feature in addition to the old list of alphabetized drugs followed by paragraphs worth of slang terms.

The new document also has slang terms for LSD, cocaine, heroin, MDMA and many other drugs.

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