Mixing Different Cannabis Strains Together

Are you thinking about mixing and matching your cannabis strains? Mixing strains when smoking cannabis is sometimes referred to as a salad. So packing a variety of strains into a hand pipe makes it a salad bowl  Mixing strains is an increasingly popular way to customise your high. If you ever have an extremely potent strain, you can tone it down a bit by mixing it with a “lighter” strain. In that same vein, you can also mix buds to intensify the experience.

Mixing strains of weed can add lots to your experience. There are two primary reasons why mixing and matching might add some depth to your overall experience – cannabinoids and terpenes, and the way they blend together when combined.
Many cannabis consumers are familiar with the legendary tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the primary psychoactive in the cannabis plant. The second most common cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD), which does not produce a “high” like THC. Instead, it boosts mood and provides calming, anxiety-relieving effects. Combining THC and CBD is thought to improve the effectivity of both compounds. Consuming the two together can enhance the pain-fighting and medicinal properties of both, though CBD can also weaken the high associated with THC.

This phenomenon is called the “entourage effect”, which argues that consuming various cannabis compounds in one go can alter and enhance the effects of all of them.

Terpenes, the special molecules that give cannabis and other plants their unique tastes and fragrance, also play an important role in the entourage effect. Like cannabinoids, terpenes are found in resin glands (trichomes) that sit on the surface of buds and leaves. Also like cannabinoids, research has shown that terpenes have therapeutic properties. Terpenes and cannabinoids work in synergy to produce slightly varied effects. It’s this synergy that gives different strains not only their unique aromas but their individual experiences. For example, a strain is typically classified as an indica if it contains more than 0.5 percent myrcene. Not only is myrcene thought to be responsible for the sedative effects of cannabis, but some suggest that myrcene helps THC more rapidly cross into the brain, giving you a more powerful high.

When it comes to the difficulty of mixing and matching, that all depends on what exactly you’re trying to accomplish. If you prefer a hybrid high, but only have indica and sativa strains on hand, mixing the two in a ratio of 50:50 would be a pretty simple solution.

However, if your goals are medicinal in nature, it could be more of a challenge to pinpoint the exact blend that treats the symptoms you’re suffering from. Mixing hybrid strains can also be a bit trying, since you would have to know what strains each hybrid is comprised of.

A little bit of practice and experimentation should eventually help you determine what blends are best for you.

For best results, pair strains with interesting cannabinoid profiles or different aromas or scents that seem slightly compatible. For some, mixing strains leads to symptoms of discomfort like nausea, vomiting, and headaches. Or, if you’re used to heady highs, mixing with a relaxing indica could give your body a supreme high as well. If you’re mixing strains for the first time, you’re going to feel all the effects of each one you’re ingesting. In case you happen to have a bad reaction to the weed salad you’ve made, it’s a good idea to stay home and ride it out so that you don’t wind up feeling out of sorts while in public.