You Can Cook With Cannabis Concentrates?

Cooking with cannabis is full of possibilities. As you probably know, the most common way to cook with cannabis is by using oil or butter previously infused with dried buds. Edibles are a classic staple in the world of cannabis. A necessity among those who require smokeless options for enjoying cannabis— as well as for those who are looking to take a break or are looking to spice up the monotony of toking. But did you know that you can also cook with cannabis concentrates? Just as with flower, getting dosing right can be a little tricky. Read on to learn how.

You want the concentrate to melt, and the cannabinoids to covert from THCA to THC. Solvent concentrates like wax, shatter, budder and live resin easily melt into a liquid oil, but hash like bubble, moroccan and dry sift retain their solid state, even when decarbed. Use a fine mesh strainer to grind decarboxylated hash into a fine powder. This powder can be used to infuse marijuana into edibles.

If you are decarbing more than a few grams of concentrate in a single container, bake them for 45 minutes.

Dosing

Even though we are making high potency edibles, we still want to make sure we calculate their potency for your safety and others you may share with. BHO edibles are powerful stuff with a 55% to 90% THC potency range. Compare that to Godfather OG— the strongest strain on the planet coming in at 34% THC, and you can see why we are serious about calculating their potency.

It is a very simple process, especially for those using full grams of concentrate. For example, let’s say you want to make peanut butter cookies that pack a good punch and your recipe yields 30 cookies. If your BHO tests at 75% THC, then you would have 750mg of THC to work with. When you divide your 750mg of THC by 30 (number of cookies), you will get your serving size dosage—which is 25mg of THC.

Tips For Making Edibles With Concentrates

 

1. Silicone and glass are the only substances that your concentrate should touch. If the concentrate is packaged in a glass container, you can place the container in the oven. If you use CO2 oil in a syringe or a concentrate in a silicone container, scoop it out and place it in a small glass dish before placing it in the oven. Use small silicone spatulas to scoop every drop of concentrate. A gram of oil is small, so every drop counts.

2. Concentrates are STICKY. If you have a hard time getting it from the oven to your batter, add a tablespoon of butter or oil to the concentrate before you put it in the oven to decarb. The melted fat will help you transfer the concentrate and prevent it from sticking to bowls and spatulas.

3. When stirring concentrates into a recipe, make sure the concentrate is stirred evenly into wet ingredients. Don’t try to add a gram of melted wax to a cup of flour – it won’t mix in well. If you can, time it so you are mixing your wet ingredients as you pull the concentrate out of the oven.

4. Stir, stir, stir. You want an even amount of cannabis oil in each serving, so the oil must be evenly mixed throughout the recipe.

5. We can still use lecithin, even without a solvent like butter, oil or alcohol. Lecithin creates an emulsion that helps to evenly distribute the marijuana into each dose, and it helps the body absorb the medicine, which means our cannabis medicine is more effective. But lecithin tastes awful, so I tend to only use it for skin creams.

6. Even though we don’t have to, we can create infused butters and oils with concentrates. I like using concentrates in compound butters (let butter warm to room temperature, then stir in herbs and other flavorings). Concentrates reduce the flavor of marijuana so the flavors I add, like honey, lavender and dill, taste better.

7. Do not make an alcohol tincture with concentrates. Cannabis and alcohol do not create an emulsion, so the marijuana doesn’t evenly distribute. Pouring a gram of melted wax into room temperature alcohol just creates a glob of oil at the bottom of the glass.

8. Dosing: Marijuana concentrates have anywhere from 60-90% potency, which means each gram of concentrate has 600-900 milligrams of THC (or other cannabinoids like CBD, CBG, etc)

Unlike when making cannabutter or oil, however, you can use much smaller amounts of fat, making this a great option for people who are trying to cut down on their fat consumption or reduce calories. Plus, you’ll also need much less concentrate to infuse a meal than you would flower, seeing that concentrates are much more potent.

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